Bowling Tip #46

To help keep your wrist firm, try pressing the tip of the index finger of your bowling hand hard against the ball. This will keep your wrist firm without tightening up your whole arm.

Bowling Tip #47

Your non-bowling arm is almost as important as your bowling one. It helps provide balance. Your non-bowling hand and arm come off the ball at the end of the push off and should go out to the side of your body to help offset the extra weight you have on the bowling side of your body. If you don't get that arm out to the side for balance, you'll tend to fall off the shot. Having this arm even with your body or slightly behind your torso with your hand waist high or higher and about 18" or so from your body will provide the counter-balance you need. 'Textbook' says not behind your body. Tell this to WRW Jr. or to Carolyn Dorin-Ballard, both of whom have their non-bowling arm about 90 to their back at the finish position. Do what works!

Another very important component of the non-bowling arm is the position of the thumb. If your thumb is up at delivery, there could be a tendency to roll the shoulder forward. It is usually more effective to have the thumb down. Check which one you do and then try it the other way. You will find turning the thumb up or down can give you some options you didn't know you had!

Bowling Tip #48

If you want to get the ball into an earlier roll than normal, target the dots, which are 7' out on the lane rather than the arrows. The first time you try this you might feel like these dots are right in your face by the time you get to the foul line. They're not, of course, but it is how you feel. Be careful not to allow your head and torso to go down when learning to look at the dots. Your head and shoulders must still say up.

Bowling Tip #49

If you want to get the ball into an earlier roll than normal, target the dots, which are 7' out on the lane rather than the arrows. The first time you try this you might feel like these dots are right in your face by the time you get to the foul line. They're not, of course, but it is how you feel. Be careful not to allow your head and torso to go down when learning to look at the dots. Your head and shoulders must still say up.

Some people have success learning this by pretending they are looking at their target through the bottom of their glasses (regardless of whether you wear any or not although it doesn't work very well if you wear bifocals!) or that they have a glass of water on their head they cannot spill.

To get more comfortable looking at the dots, try looking a foot or so in front (closer to you) of the arrows for a few shots. Then go two more feet and two more feet until you are comfortable looking at the dots. Although these dots are not on the same boards as the arrows, they are still great targeting aids and are generally used when you need to get the ball rolling earlier or when you need to decrease the distance you put the ball out onto the lane. The dots are on 3, 5, 8, 11, 14, 26, 29, 32, 35, and 37. So if your target is the second arrow, you might want to look one right of the fourth dot. That is, of course, if you are trying to lay the ball down on 10 and be at 10 at the arrows. If you're trying to swing 10, you might want to look at the fourth dot. That would put your laydown point on 11½ or 12. The ball would be on 11 at the dots and 10 at the arrows, etc.

Bowling Tip #50

It is more important that you practice frequently than that you practice for long periods of time. Thirty minutes a day will get you closer to your long-term goals faster than 2 hours on Sunday. Take breaks while you practice, at least a minute every ten. Get a drink or sit down and plan your next few minutes. Just step away and get a different perspective.

Practice tasks in segments. Mindless, undirected practice is unproductive. Never keep score in practice. If you're keeping score, winning matters. If winning matters, you're not practicing. Have specific goals you want to accomplish in your practice sessions. Five minutes on the feel of a good push off, five minutes on follow through and you don't think about your push off in the follow through time slot. Your foundation must be built on the bricks of individual components - strong and linked together with repetition and muscle memory. We don't want a foundation built on sand that will crumble under the slightest pressure.

May all your corner pins fall!!